Tag Archives: vientiane

Japan x Sabai: Sounds, Sights, Tastes, Smiles, Friendship a Feast at Tokyo’s Laos Festival ’19

Laos Festival 2019 Celebrated in Tokyo, Japan May 25-26, 2019

Dancing, Friendship, Frivolity & Unmistakable Sound of World Heritage Listed Bamboo-Piped Khaen Among the Greetings to Tokyo’s Famous Yoyogi Park for Japan’s Laos Festival 2019, The Laotian Times reports.

Passengers Plus: 2nd Terminal In Plans for Wattay International Airport in Laos’ Capital Vientiane

Vientiane's Wattay International Airport in 2018 (Hazama Ando Corporation)

Increasing passenger numbers via Vientiane’s Wattay Airport as Laos pushes plans for a second terminal forward in capital.

Wildlife In Sights: Pressures On Iconic Tiger, Elephant Draws Media Attention To Challenges Facing Laos

Tiger & Elephant Populations Under Local, Regional, Global Pressure: Laos biodiversity in the international media spotlight.

With the release of a major UN report on biodiversity loss, the state of and threats to wildlife worldwide and in hotspots like Laos including iconic species like the tiger and elephant draw more international media attention, The Laotian Times reports.

The most comprehensive ever completed, the UN Report IPBES Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services found Nature’s Dangerous Decline ‘Unprecedented’; Species Extinction Rates ‘Accelerating’ 

The efforts of one award-winning wildlife defender to shed light on the plight of animals kept at illegal tiger farms posing as zoos in Laos was covered by the Washington Post.

Emaciated Tiger (Washington Post)

Emaciated Tiger (Washington Post)

“They all want hope and happy endings,” The Washington Post quotes Swiss conservationist Ammann as saying of many well-meaning yet naive folk at home and around the world.

“And I don’t see any happy endings. I can’t create fiction from what I see as fact,” 

Alleged Tiger Trader Nikhom Keovised (Washington Post)

Alleged Tiger Trader Nikhom Keovised (Washington Post)

Meanwhile, pachyderms were the focus of coverage by US-based National Public Radio (NPR) ‘A Million Elephants’ No More: Conservationists In Laos Rush To Save An Icon.

“The national government also has a reputation of being supportive of elephant conservation efforts across Laos. Within the last 30 years, catching wild elephants and trading wildlife have been banned. Laws severely restrict the logging industry in its use of elephants. Yet, despite these efforts, “if current trajectories continue there will be no elephants left in Laos by the year 2030,” NPR quoted an article co-written by Chrisantha Pinto, an American biologist at the center, as saying.

Challenges Facing Laos' Wildlife including Iconic Tigers and Elephants (NPR)

Challenges Facing Lao’ Wildlife including Iconic Tigers and Elephants (NPR)

The challenges facing the planet, its plants and animals are real.

What Would Buddha Do?

With a biodiversity hotspot like Laos under pressure from regional and global pressures brought by unsustainable human activity and law-breaking, it’s time to get serious about enforcing the rule of law to protect what natural beauty the country has left for the next generations of our and all species.

Revitalized Role: New United Nations Resident Coordinator Ms Sara Sekkenes Assumes Post in Laos

The United Nations in Lao PDR has a new Resident Coordinator, the most senior UN Official in Laos.

Ms. Sara Sekkenes a national of Norway succeeds Ms. Kaarina Immonen of Finland in the key diplomatic and development role.

Laotian Eye: Faster Times At Pi Mai As Culture, Continuity, Change Collide at Lao New Year

Laotian Eye: Faster Times At Pi Mai As Culture, Continuity, Change Collide

Thailand knows the time of year as Songkran. Cambodia has Chol Chnam Thmey. Myanmar marks the occasion with Thingyan. In Laos, Boun Pi Mai.

Also Known as Lao New Year, the biggest festival on the Lao calendar brings three days of celebration and rejoicing across the country and beyond, taking place every year from April 14th to 16th.

Celebrating Pi Mai (Lao New Year)

While it’s said each month has a different celebration for the people of Laos, Boun Pi Mai is certainly a very special one to Laotians at home and abroad.

Please Don’t Rush, It’s Wet!

Times change and social mores are on the move, influencing lifestyles of contemporary Laos.

 

Celebrating Pi Mai AKA Lao New Year in Laos

Celebrating Pi Mai AKA Lao New Year in Laos

The celebration of Lao New Year is no different. Yet one constant throughout is water.

Whether its ceremonially offering respect to elders or playing and throwing or sprinkling it on friends, a primary activity is always to get others wet.

Many folks set up a small paddling pool in front of their house.

Others go around in a pickup with a water bucket and throw water for fun, despite it being officially frowned upon.

The roadsides of Vientiane and other cities brighten up, with shopkeepers offering bold New Year fashions to the passing public.

People dress up for the celebration, particularly in Luang Prabang where traditions hold tightest.

ເທວະດາຫລວງ ໄປບູຊາ ຄາຣະວະ ແລະຟ້ອນອວຍພອນປີໃຫມ່ລາວ ຢູ່ວັດຊຽງທອງ ໃນວັນທີ 15/04/2019

Posted by ນະຄອນຫລວງພຣະບາງ Luangprabang City on ວັນຈັນ ທີ 15 ເມສາ 2019

There is a conflict between the decorum required at places of worship and on the street beyond.

Many don’t know the history of when it’s started and why.

Celebrating Pi Mai AKA Lao New Year in Laos

Celebrating Pi Mai AKA Lao New Year in Laos

As a young and curious boy, I heard from my grandfather that it’s a Buddhist festival.

As devotees, we believe (as followers of many other religions also do) that New Year can take bad things away and bring good fortune.

Of course, the festival known as Boun Pi Mai is not only celebrated in Laos.

Celebrations in neighboring countries all derive from the same Buddhist calendar.

These might have been scheduled to coincide with time between harvest and planting seasons to provide a window of rare leisure in the year’s hectic schedule.

These days I can not remember my childhood New Year celebrations in great detail, yet I am sure we didn’t have so many activities available as recently.

Forgotten memories return when I see the children playing with water in a village in Ngoi district near the town of Luang Prabang province.

Celebrating Pi Mai AKA Lao New Year in Laos

Celebrating Pi Mai AKA Lao New Year in Laos

The village was quite rustic, but the children were having heaps of fun just as I did with my friends some 25 years ago.

They fetched water from a stream in the woods.

In my time we had to pump it out of the ground by hand.

Before throwing it over each other of course!

Growing up, our home was by the main roadside of Nontae village inXaythany district, about 25km from Vientiane.

We had a water pump in the village which was close to my house.

All of our friends would be there playing with water together.

We were delighted anytime whenever some people were passing by, so we hurried up to pump the water out and throw at them. We would never tire of it.

I also remember that at the time, many of our fellow countryfolks of the Hmong and Khmu ethnicity didn’t celebrate Boun Pi Mai so much as they might today.

@Lao Youth Radio FM 90.0 Mhz Lao Youth Union

Posted by Laos Briefly on ວັນພະຫັດ ທີ 26 ເມສາ 2018

Due to the difference in cultures, they were sometimes furious when we threw water at them, but we were not concerned enough to stop.

Whatever they said we still gave a blessing to them all the times while showering them repeatedly.

Back to the Village & Family Homes

My family is big and extended one like a tree.

As my grandparents stayed in my house, most of our family would have an appointment at the new year to visit and have a Somma ceremony.

Somma sees children seek forgiveness from parents and older adults by giving Khan-ha (a set of offerings comprising five pairs of flowers and candles) and also conduct a Baci ceremony as well.

I don’t know when I first experienced the Somma ceremony, but we did it with older family members every year for as long as I can remember.

In the past, we had a long three-day celebration but spent more of that time with family and cousins in our village.

Maybe it’s because we didn’t have a car to take us to go away anywhere.

We would do all the traditional and cultural ceremonies such as Somma, Baci, bathing Buddha statues in our local area.

Of course, the festival was primarily a family and community celebration. It was a timeless joy to experience these together.

Celebrating Pi Mai AKA Lao New Year in Laos

Celebrating Pi Mai AKA Lao New Year in Laos

Today, Lao New Year remains the biggest festival celebration and taking place everywhere nationwide.

Of course, anyone of any ethnic group or nationality can have fun together in Laos these days at Boun Pimai.

However, some things are changing. More and more cultural traditions are being left by the wayside.

Celebrating Pi Mai AKA Lao New Year in Laos

Young people have more time for loud music than culture, especially along the roadsides, house and drinking venues.

Of course, it’s enjoyable to mess around with water and have fun, but we should be aware of the meaning behind it.

Laotian youth at home and abroad should also know what Lao New Year means and continue the traditional forms of celebration for the benefit of current and future generations.

Future Electric: EV Destiny Driving Rapidly Towards Laos

Electric Vehicles (EV) closer in Laos with Agreement Between EDl & EVLao

Promising prospects for electric vehicles (EV) in Laos as an agreement signed between power producer ລັດວິສາຫະກິດໄຟຟ້າລາວ EDL and electric-powered vehicle proponents EVLao, The Laotian Times reports.

Looking to industry leaders at manufacturing hotpots like Japan, Germany & China, it would appear the early arrival of the electric age when it comes to motor vehicle transport is already well and truly upon us.

In Laos, a milestone was marked with the holding of the nation’s first electric vehicle summit and MoU signing last week in the capital Vientiane at the very first Lao National Electric Vehicle Summit.

. The agreement will see the trial of vehicle charging stations and technology to push progress towards a future where electric vehicles are more free to traverse the highways and byways of Laos and beyond.

ພາບບັນຍາກາດງານ LAO National Electric Vehicle Summit 2019

Posted by EVLao on ວັນພະຫັດ ທີ 4 ເມສາ 2019


“The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed.” – William Gibson

At a time when technology is progressing faster than ever, these words attributed to futurist and science-fiction writer William Gibson are revealing.

It doesn’t take a genius to guess that in the future, roads in Laos are expected to see many more electric cars than we can see today.

A net electricity exporter and fuel oil importer, one can see the attraction of electric vehicles even before the other benefits are taken into account.

Yet with a transformation this big, there is plenty to consider.

Preparing the socio-economy for the changing needs of the modern era as they quickly transforming with the availability of cleaner energy technologies involves resolutions to complicated challenges.

Given that successful deployment of electric vehicles in Laos requires public and private partnerships, It is important to look at technical mechanisms for using electric vehicles in Laos as well as tax policies and the expected infrastructure investment profiles.

Posted by EVLao on ວັນອາທິດ ທີ 31 ມີນາ 2019

EV Lao and EDL agree to trial electric vehicles

An aim is to study the feasibility of using the electricity system to provide energy-powered vehicles in the Lao PDR.

On the morning of April 2, 2019, at Landmark Hotel in Vientiane, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) was held jointly with EV Lao Co., Ltd. between the Lao Electric Power Enterprise EDL and EV Lao Company Limited.

How long until the entire world (& Laos!) has electric cars?

It’s a billion dollar question.

What we do know is that the vehicle fleet in Laos, as in other countries, must become less carbon intensive if we are to avoid the worst effects of catastrophic climate change.

While not exactly at the leading edge of uptake, prospects for electric vehicles in Laos are positive from the current low base.

The movements in the global environment and technical landscape are favoring the development of low carbon transportation in ways never seen before.

Laos will be affected by developments worldwide and in major manufacturing hubs.

The nation’s capacity to benefit will depend on both regulators, public and private sectors to grab a hold of the wheel and steer Laos to a cleaner motoring future.

 

Electric Vehicles (EV) closer in Laos with Agreement Between EDl & EVLao

Electric Vehicles (EV) closer in Laos with Agreement Between EDl & EVLao

Flying In: Singapore’s Scoot Swoops Into Laos’ Vientiane, World Heritage Listed Luang Prabang

Flying from Singapore to Laos and beyond just got easier after Scoot launched its inaugural flights from the city-state to the jewel of the Mekong.

The inaugural journey marks the start of a three-times-weekly service from Singapore to Luang Prabang and Vientiane.

The flight was reported in local media including The Laotian Times sister publication ລາວໂພສຕ໌ Laopost.

The addition of the two destinations in Laos brings to a total of 67 in Scoot’s network across 19 countries and territories.

It is also the only airline offering direct Singapore-Laos services after routes were transferred from sister airline SilkAir, the regional wing of Singapore Airlines.

The routes will be operated with Scoot’s A320 aircraft.

To celebrate Scoot’s maiden flight to Laos, traditional Lao music was played over the sound system in the aircraft.

Passengers onboard were tested on their knowledge of Laos and Scoot in a fun quiz.

Five lucky passengers walked away with prizes including Scoot travel voucher valued at SGD100, a Scoot travel organizer, a Laos travel guide, Scoot-in-Style lounge access and for the kids, a Scoot Nano Brick Aircraft and Control Tower Playset.

The flights operate on a circular routing departing from Singapore for Luang Prabang, followed by Vientiane, before heading back to Singapore.

Chief Commercial Officer of Scoot Mr Vinod Kannan welcomed guests celebrating the inaugural flight.

“Laos is a hidden gem that is yet to be discovered by many and is the ideal destination for people looking to escape from the concrete jungle,” he said.

“With Vientiane and Luang Prabang joining our network, our customers now have more travel choices, and travelers from Laos can also explore more destinations around the world via Singapore.”

Upon landing at Luang Prabang Airport and Wattay International Airport in Vientiane, the A320 aircraft named Yellow Tail, was greeted with a traditional water cannon salute.

Lumberings & Longings: Trials, Tales As Domesticated Elephants, Handlers Adjust to A New Era in Laos

Laos Mahout

Like wildlife in biological hotspots worldwide, Laos’ wild and domesticated elephants alike are facing a time of rapid and significant change, amid increased man-made developments and a fast-changing natural and socio-economic environment, Laotian Times writes.